Events > 2017 > October > Gala launch of Climate Keys

About this event:

Created by Paul Jenkins

St. Mary Magdalene Parish Church, Munster Square, London NW1 3PL

Doors open 6.40.

Concert starts 7pm

Tickets £8/£4 on the door

Or book in advance www.marksonpianos.com/concert/concerts.html

Ticket includes post-concert glass of wine

This gala launch concert features ten UK-based ClimateKeys pianists; Natalie Bleicher, Hannah Gill, Daniel Grimwood, Lola Perrin, Mikael Pettersson, Tim Pryce, Elena Riu, Elli Spackova, Caroline Tyler & Nafis Umerkulova

Guest Speaker: Sir Jonathon Porritt
Introducer: Hannah van den Brul
& Special Guests: 
Parents of Zane Gbangbola, Kye Gbangbola & Nicole Lawler, ‘Truth about Zane

Talking about climate change needs to move into the center of all we do, so I initiated ClimateKeys for concert pianists across the world to put the conversation into the heart of their concerts. So far over 100 pianists and expert speakers in 20 countries have joined.

Lola Perrin, ClimateKeys founder

Programme of pieces

  • NATALIE BLEICHER
    Karen Tanaka – Wind Energy (Our Planet Earth No.7)
    Karen Tanaka – Light (Our Planet Earth No. 13)
  • HANNAH GILL
    Debussy – Des pas sur la neige (Prelude No.5 Book 1)
    Debussy – Ce qu’a vu le vent d’ouest (Prelude No.6 Book 1)
  • DANIEL GRIMWOOD
    Lola Perrin – We are playing with fire, a situation we are likely to come to regret if we don’t get a grip on ourselves
    Liszt – Transcendental Etude No.12 ‘Chasse-Neige’
  • LOLA PERRIN
    Lola Perrin – Kalahari Flower (Three Rhapsodies No.1 2006)
  • MIKAEL PETTERSSON
    JS Bach – Praeludium from Partita No.1 BWV 825
    (S Prokovieff – Extract from Precipitato, 3rd movement Sonata No. 7 Op 83)
    JS Bach – Sarabande from Partita No.1 BWV 825
  • TIM PRYCE
    Debussy – La Cathedrale Engloutie (Prelude No.10 Book 1)
    Lennox Berkeley – Prelude No.1 from Six Preludes, Op.23
  • ELENA RIU
    Sophia Gubaidulina – The Little Tit (from Musical Toys 1969)
    Jean Sibelus – The Birch (from Five Pieces for Piano Op 75)
    Sophia Gubaidulina – The Woodpecker (from Musical Toys 1969)
    Peter Sculthorpe – Moon (from Night Pieces 1971)
  • ELLI SPACKOVA
    Scriabin – Prelude No.9 in E major (Op 11)
    Scriabin – Prelude No.10 in C# minor (Op 11)
    Chopin – ‘Revolutionary’ Etude No.12 in C minor (Op 10)
  • CAROLINE TYLER
    Smetana – On the seashore Concert etude in G# minor (Op 17)
    Saint-Saens – Aquarium (Carnival of the Animals)
  • NAFIS UMERKULOVA
    Scriabin – Sonata No.4 in F# major (Op 30)

ClimateKeys is a pioneering example of how music, working together with science, can promote a new, positive and far-reaching dialogue around climate change … In order to take the action necessary around climate change, we must – through works like ClimateKeys – better imagine our global community and better understand ourselves to be significant and responsible climate citizens.

Hannah van den Brul, MA Music in Development SOAS)

I’m thinking of something one of my piano teachers once said, “I cleanse myself with Bach, and what comes to mind now is that I perform Prokovieff, flanked on both sides by Bach. Bach could represent continuity, stability, and pre-and-post climate change and Prokovieff disorder, chaos and climate change, potentially sparking thoughts about why everything that is fast, loud, new and changing is deemed to be good, whilst everything that is continuous, stable, old and soft is held in less regard. My performance would thus reflect on pre-and-post climate change with a hopeful ending.

Pianist Mikael Pettersson

Although musicians and artists have a history of dissecting political and current affairs, climate change is noticeably absent from contemporary cultural discourse. I’m in ClimateKeys because it’s valuable in providing a platform for performers and audiences to reflect upon and discuss issues which may not otherwise feature in daily conversation.

Pianist Hannah Gill

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